27 ions and ion nuclear connections of an atom mentioned by conventional chemical processes without changing such as cation (pronunciation are cat ions); A negative negative ion is called anion (anion). For example, sodium atoms, with 11 protons and 11 electrons, easily lose an electron to produce cations, created in 11 protons and 10 electrons, so the load of the load has the internal load of ion. expressed by an exhibition; And it means a net voltage comes from the loss of one, two or three electrons, the presentation and the net tension, the result from the consolidation of one, two or three electrons, the formation of ions of one of one. Na atom is a diagram shown as follows: quore with 17 protons and 17 electrons often win an electron in chemical reactions and create ions 133 in common metal atoms to lose electrons to form to form Cation, while the atoms do not have to form anion symbols of symbols , including blocks, for the following ions: (a) ions with 22 protons, 26 neutrons and 19 electrons; . b) When referring to a table or drawing periodic elements, we see that sulfur (symbol) has a number of nuclei of 16, each atom or sulfur has 16 protons. It is said that ions also have 16 neutrons, according to the electrons, its network, so it is a complete ionic symbol, we will often focus on net ion loading and ignore their large quantities, except for When the electrons have ions? Answer: 34 Proton and 36 electrons In addition to simple ions such as Na+ and Cl- also have polyiatomions such as NO3 (nitrification) and SO42- (sulfate). They include atoms connected as in a molecule, but have positive or negative loads. We will take more examples of the multicellular ions of part 28 in the account. Distinguishing the chemical properties of ions: Although basic may be the same (more or less some electrons), but the behavior is different from the gas ion load, closer to the press board, compared to the members. The noble Gaz family does not react chemical and only forms very little connection. The electrons are very stable For example, the loss of an electron of a sodium atom has the same number of electrons with Argon Neonatom atom (Argon atom No. 18) will use this simple observation to explain the formation of ion in chapter 8, where they are, where they We discuss chemical connection. During the very useful time to remember to download the ion, especially the elements of the left and right side of the table, displayed in Figure 222, , Figure 222 Loads of common ions are found to be found found found found found In ionic compounds provided by expected costs for Bari and Oxygen's most stable ions will think we think we think we will think we will think we will give. That we think we think we think we think we think we think we think we think we think we think we think we think that they I think we think we think we are. Suppose we assume that these factors form ions with the same electronic numbers that Bari has the nearest nucleus of 56 aristocracy, the nearest xenon, 54 of the bari atom can achieve the stability of 54 electrons. Creating its two electrons and the cow of the 8 atomic cation to reach the intuitive atomic cation of oxygen No. 8 of the gas used. The next noble gas is a neon, the number of oxygen nuclei can achieve these stable electrons by obtaining two electrons and thus, formed through education in education. Therefore, the practice of practicing anion practice is the load of the most stable ionaminiman Factors of the left and right elements. On the table, as shown in Figure 222, the download of these ions, these ions refer to their position in the table in the table on the left side of the table, for example, the elements of the group 1A (alkali metal ) 1+ ion and elements of group 2a (alkaline land) 2 + ions on the other side of the table of the elements of the 7A group (halogen) sample 1 -ion and elements of the group 6a sample 2, like them. We will do later, see in the text, many other groups do not make connections that it is not an easy rule, a large part of the chemical activity implies the transmission of electrons between quality to one picture 2 other We have Na + ions and opposite load objects, but Na + and ions are connected to form the compound sodium chloride (NaCl), which we know better, such as chloride, salt table. Popular sodium, an example of an ion connection, a connection contains positive and negative ions (b) The arrangement of these ions in solid sodium chloride (NaCl) (including molecules) of its ingredients. In general, the cations are metal ions, while the anions do not have metal ions if you wait, -Metal, two other compounds including not (correct) Ulaire are predicted by created by The following connections, so the following connections are molecules: FES, Answer: CBR4 and P4O6131 ionics compounds are organized in three -dimensional structures. Na + and Clion in NaCl are shown in the 223 illustration because there is no discreet NaCl molecule, in fact we can write an experimental formula for this substance. Only experimental formulas can be written for most ionic compounds that experimental formulas can easily write for a compound ion, if we know the loads with an electric connection with electricity. , ions always occur in ion connection in such a relationship with the total load corresponding to the total load. And so, take into account these examples and other examples, you will only see whether the speed in the cation and anion is the same or not, the index for each ion is 1, if the load is not the same, the load of an ion (without ECO) becomes another index in ion, for example, the ionic compound is formed at the end of Mg (forming ions Mg2 +) and N (forming N3 -ions) is Mg3N2: formula Given the sample of the com exercise that the experimental formulas of (A) and ions are compounds; (b) and ions; (c) and ions? Solution (A) Three ions are required to compensate for the load of the ion. Therefore, the formula (b) requires two ions to compensate for three load ions (ie the total load of the total load and the total negative load)
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